The Sense of the Story on The Common Reader

My short article, “The Sense of the Story” is up on The Common Reader blog today.

Back in January, Michaella Thornton’s in-depth look into how layoffs hit women and mothers (Pinkslips: How Layoffs Create Double Jeopardy for Working Mothers) included part of my experience of getting laid off from St. Louis Community College.

“The Sense of the Story” is a response, not exactly to her article, but to the experience of telling her my story and having it included in a wider story of working women, pay inequality, and sexism. I’m grateful for Michaella’s article, the chance to share my experience, write a response, and yes, even for the layoff itself.

Rejection Slip: National Catholic Reporter

Rejection Slip is a series of pieces I submitted for publication that were rejected by the editors. Oh well.

I submitted the following piece to NCR in December, in response to a multi-part discussion on Catholics who have left the church. The discussion began with Melinda Henneberger’s USA Today column (November 2018) about why she left the church. Henneberger followed up in December with an article in NCR about the responses she fielded from that first article. Then, NCR published a respnse to Henneberger by a priest, Fr. David Knight, that they called “smart” and “thoughtful.” For the reasons I outline below, I found his response to be shallow, arrogant, and fallacious.

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Revisiting the STLCC Layoffs

Michaella A. Thornton’s article, “Pink Slips: How Layoffs Create Double Jeopardy for Working Mothers,” revisits the 2018 STLCC layoffs in the context of how layoffs impact women more severely, how gender roles and expectations shape our responses to layoffs, and how layoffs neither help businesses nor refrain from punishing women harder than men. I was so pleased to be interviewed for the article, and to appear among Michaella’s intensive research, compelling narrative, and palpable passion.

The layoffs received some news coverage in 2017 and 2018. But somehow it never felt like the full story was told. I’m grateful for Michaella’s article–it’s willingness to continue reckoning with this story and re-examining this an wound, to put our story into a larger context, to shine a light on the often overlooked layoff disparities for women and mothers.

ForĀ  more background and context, here’s some of the layoff news coverage from 2017-2019.

from Inside Higher Ed

from The Riverfront Times

from St. Louis Magazine

The Riverfront Times again

Multiple pieces from The Scene, Forest Park’s campus student newspaper

Outstanding coverage from The Montage, Meramec’s campus student newspaper

from The South County Times

My Op-Ed column in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Chancellor Pittman’s response to my op-ed

A joint faculty response to Chancellor Pittman

 

Reading at The Dial Recap

I had the great pleasure of reading at The Dial Bookshop in Chicago, and being in the company of fellow readers (left to right) Emily Jungmin Yoon, Lani Montreal, and Suman Chhabra. IMG_5655.JPG

Their poems about motherhood, daughterhood, race, gender, teaching, queerness, and numinous spaces were all breathtaking. Thank you for the beautiful space, words, and gathering. And thanks to Tim Moore and Kundiman for organizing the event.

See more pics: https://www.instagram.com/p/BqijyMQn9sB/

Who Raised You?

static1.squarespace.comI’m delighted to have a poem featured on the podcast Who Raised You?

Created and hosted by (my friend and former colleague at SWIC) Treasure Shields Redmond and Karen Jia Lian Yang, Who Raised You is a St. Louis podcast that explores poetry, race, culture, identity–all over a kitchen table conversation. I’m so pleased to be part of their first episode of Season 2.

See the latest episode here (my poem, “Why We Are This Way,” appears at the top of show) and the Who Raised You blog here.